Dive deep into the greatest and most enduring problems of human existence, drawing from the wells of wisdom and experience in the Christian tradition.

Philosophy literally means “the love of wisdom.” At Calvin, we practice this love in the context of Christian faith, whether you are a philosophy major or want to add skills in critical thinking and careful examination to another discipline. Join the discussion and challenge your understanding of being and knowing, culture and technology, meaning and beauty, ethics and business, and the very nature God.

The world-class philosophy education you’ll get at Calvin is built on a tradition of excellence. Calvin College consistently produces and attracts some of the most influential minds in the discipline.

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Quick Facts
  • 4

    Presidents of the American Philosophical Association were either alums or teachers in Calvin’s philosophy department.

  • 100%

    of 2015 philosophy graduates were employed or in grad school one year after graduation.

  • >50%

    of philosophy majors are double majors.

Featured book

Free Will and Theism: Connections, Contingencies, and Concerns

by Kevin Timpe, Daniel Speak

Concerns both about the nature of free will and about the credibility of theistic belief and commitment have long preoccupied philosophers. In addition, there can be no denying that the history of philosophical inquiry into these two issues has been dynamic and, at least to some degree, integrated.

In a great many cases, classical treatments of one have influenced classical treatments of the other--and in a variety of ways. Without pretending to be able to trace all the historical integrations of these treatments, there is no real question that these philosophical interrelations exist and are worthy of further exploration. In addition, contemporary discussions contain more than a few hints of suspicion that theistic belief is adversely affecting the purity of inquiry into contours of human free will.

Nevertheless, until now there has been no volume systematically exploring the relationship between religious beliefs and various accounts of free will in the contemporary domain. With a particular eye on how the former might be--either legitimately or illegitimately--affecting the latter, this collection fills an important gap in the current debate. Here, sixteen leading philosophers focus their attention on a crucial point of intellectual intersection, with surprising and illuminating results.

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